Advocacy

This is my list (so far) for reaching out with art.

1. I do the annual "Art To Remember" program for 3rd graders only. They each create a picture to be reproduced on products. The children receive their ordered items just before Christmas. These items make great gifts. Students are not obligated to make a purchase.
This is not a fund raiser for us, but the money made allows me to purchase prizes from Oriental Trading for student good behaviors.

Check out Art To Remember's web site  http://www.arttoremember.com/



2. Local Art Exhibits

3. All-School Pumpkin Decorating Contest

4. ART WEBSITE

5. ABC SCHOOL ART Blog

6. Sixth graders created puppets and performed the play, “The Old Lady Who Swallowed A Fly” for kindergarten and first graders.

7. Parents were invited into the art room to create art with their second grade child. This was during the daily school schedule. We did Gyotaku (fish printing).



Art Collaboration with Other Disciplines  

1. Integrated Music and Art  when the 4th grade students created guitars in art class to play in their music concert. Concert theme: “Rock and Roll.”

2. In collaboration with 4th grade Social Studies and their annual Lewis & Clark lesson, the art class created leather-like journals. The inserted pages were for drawing.

3. Art and 6th Grade Social Studies Curriculum Collaboration (Grant $). Art projects were developed that follow their Ancient Cultures Studies from Stone Age to Medieval Period.

4. 1st-6th grades All School Writing and Art Competition (Grant $)




School Newsletter Articles
If your school sends newsletters to parents, its a great form of communication for art teachers too. Every few years I include an art article in it. Below are two I use. 

Article #1 
YOUR OWN ONE-OF-A-KIND ART!
I'm very proud of the artistic efforts your children put into their art projects, I hope you are too.
Your child's art is handmade, not a kit or mass produced. They molded it, painted it, cut and glued it. Their ideas went into it. The artwork has your child's touch all over it, which makes it a valuable one-of-a-kind keepsake.

Article #2 
WAYS TO VALUE YOUR CHILD’S ART
Your child’s art work is handmade, not a kit or mass produced. Creating art is an achievement your child should feel good about and therefore deserves some special appreciation. Here are some ways to value their creations. 
SAVE IT 
       1. Date their art
      2. Store it in plastic containers larger than 12x18
      3. If storage is a problem, especially for three dimensional art, take photographs of it 
          (include your budding artist).
DISPLAY IT
         1. Use your fridge as an art gallery.
       2. Have a bedroom or living room art show exhibiting your child’s art work. Invite the grandparents 
           and serve goodies. Your young artist could tell a bit about each art piece.
       3. Display the art in your office or workplace.
PRINT IT
Take a digital picture of your child's art and use a computer photo program to make adjustments, then print it as a thank you, birthday, or holiday card. Your child would be so proud!

Article #3
Look what I made!" proclaims the child artist to his family. What a wonderful invite for us to share in this child's artistic creation. How proud we are in seeing our child's handmade and very personal art project, perhaps tattered a bit from the trip home in a book bag. Our youngster's art work is a one-of-a-kind keepsake, so different from manufactured things. Here are some ways to value their creations.
SAVE IT
       1. Date their art
      2. Store it in plastic containers larger than 12x18
      3. If storage is a problem, especially for three dimensional art, take photographs of it
          (include your budding artist).

DISPLAY IT
         1. Use your fridge as an art gallery.
       2. Have a bedroom or living room art show exhibiting your child’s art work. Invite the grandparents
           and serve goodies. Your young artist could tell a bit about each art piece.
       3. Display the art in your office or workplace.

PRINT IT 
Take a digital picture of your child's art and use a computer photo program to make adjustments, then print it as a thank you, birthday, or holiday card. Your child would be so proud!






I have this poster hanging on the art room door. 
Below are positive art statements I sometimes display around the room. I use to print them off and have the students glue them to the back of their finished artwork.





A 6th grade girl once said, "Art helps me get through the week!"































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